12th grade | 11th grade | 10th grade | 9th grade | College | Testing | Profile

 

Welcome to the Counselor's Corner

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MC900156753[1]Check the District Webpage for the 2014-2015 school calendar.

  September 29:  A representative from LMU will be here to speak to prospective students (current seniors).  If you are interested in speaking with the LMU representative, please sign up in the guidance office. 

October 2, 2014 from 6-8:00 p.m.  Come Meet Morehead State University at the London Community Center in London, KY.  During Meet MSU, current Eagles, Eagle alumni and faculty and staff will be available to answer any question you may have about our academic programs and services, scholarships, student life and more.  Application fee will be waived for those who attend.  Light refreshments will be served.  Register to win a $500 textbook voucher and other door prizes.  Advance registration is available at www.moreheadstate.edu/meetmus or by calling 800-585-6781.  You may also register at the door. 

MC900251265[1]October 7:  End of the first 9-week grading period.

October 8:  A representative from Lindsey Wilson College will be here to speak to prospective students (current seniors).  If you are interested in speaking with the Lindsey Wilson College representative, please sign up in the guidance office. 

October 9:  Are you interested in attending Sullivan University?  There will be a College Preview of Sullivan University held in London, KY at the Community Center 9 AM – 6 PM.

October 15:  PSAT for select Grade 10 & 11 students (must sign-up for this test).

j0298897October 16 – 18:  Tentative date for “Fall Break”.

October 20:  University of the Cumberlands will host the Southeastern Kentucky Regional College Fair.  All seniors will be invited to attend this fair.  Field trip permission forms will be required for this trip and will be available soon.

October 25:  National ACT Test Date!  ** Notice to all WCHS students – make sure you have your admissions ticket “with photo” and another acceptable form of picture id.  See you counselor for more details.  You will be denied entrance to the test if you do not have both of these appropriate identification markers.   

 

 

November 3-7:  College Application Week for seniors.

 November 5:  Come See Blue For Yourself Event.  This field trip is for current high school seniors to take a campus tour of UK.  Sign-ups will be available in the guidance office thru October 15. 

November 7:  Deadline to register for the December 13, 2014 National ACT Test Date.  Register online at www.actstudent.org.  ** Notice to all WCHS students – make sure you have your admissions ticket “with photo” and another acceptable form of picture id.  See you counselor for more details.  You will be denied entrance to the test if you do not have appropriate identification.   

November 17:  Admissions staff from the University of Pikeville will be on campus during lunch to visit with prospective students.

December 1:  Deadline for applications to be completed and returned to the high school guidance office. 

December 3, 4, 5:  ASVAB for all juniors and select seniors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Text Box: Here’s our guidance staff.  Please call, email or stop by if you have any question.

Our staff is here to assist all students and parents in having a successful high school experience.

Contact Mrs. Reynolds, HS Counselor at linda.reynolds@whitley.kyschools.us

Mrs. Reynolds’ office is located in the Freshman Academy Office Complex.  She is available to help all WCHS students but her primary responsibilities are freshman students and Electronic Computer School – Credit Recovery.

 
 

 

 


Mrs. Faulkner’s office is located in the Main Building Office Complex.  She is available to help all WCHS students, but is primarily responsible for tracking students with the last names beginning with A - K.

 
Contact Mrs. Faulkner, HS Counselor at britney.faulkner@whitley.kyschools.us

 

 

Contact Mr. Lowrie, HS Counselor at kevin.lowrie@whitley.kyschools.us

Mr. Lowrie’s office is located in the Main Building Office Complex.  He is available to help any WCHS student, but is primarily responsible for tracking students with the last names beginning with  L - Z.

 
 

 

 

 

 


Office Hours 7:15 - 3:30 

 

 

 

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Contact Angie Canada, Records Clerk at angela.canada@whitley.kyschools.us

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

What's the big deal about school anyway?

Can't I get a good job now?

Yes, maybe you can, but the statistics are against you.  Check out the earnings and unemployment rates from people 25 years and older in Kentucky with different levels of education:

Level of education completed

Unemployment rate in 2006

Median earnings in 2006

Less than a high school diploma

11.4%

$17,077

High school graduate, no college

6.3%

$25,288

Some college, no degree

5.4%

$28,625

Associate degree

3.4%

$30,047

Bachelor’s degree

2.1%

$40,925

Master’s Degree

1.8%

$48,642

Professional degree

1.5%

$66,032

Doctoral degree

1.3%

$83,649

Source:  2008 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Median Kentucky earnings by educational level for workers 25 or older employed full time; unemployment for workers 25 or older.

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Graph of median Kentucky earnings by educational level for workers 25 or older employed full time; unemployment for workers 25 or older.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

 

Sometimes it’s hard to stay in school if you think you need to be working to earn money.  But, if you finish high school and go on to college, you’ll have a wider variety of jobs to choose from and you’ll earn more.

 

Workforce Kentucky

The Office of Employment and Training has developed a comprehensive labor market workforce information system called Workforce Kentucky.  The system is designed to serve employers, job seekers, students, counselors, educators and training providers.  This interactive Internet-based system can be accessed at www.workforcekentucky.ky.gov.  It is the largest source of labor market data in the commonwealth.  Users can explore occupations, labor markets, geographic areas, industry projections, and much more.  The following are brief explanations of the various types of information and reports available to the user.

 

Essential Skills to Getting a Job

This is good information for ALL students: Often referred to as "soft skills", work ethic, communication, teamwork and critical thinking are all must have's for youth in today's job market. http://www.dol.gov/odep/documents/essential_job_skills.pdf

 

 

Current Senior Scholarship & Program Opportunities

Title

Criteria

Deadline

WYMT Mountain

 Classic Scholarship

Each local high school may nominate 5 seniors based on academics (50% weight) and need factor (50% weight).  Proof of financial need is necessary for consideration.

-Pick up an application in the Guidance Office or Café.

-Complete application and have supporting documents ready and return to the Guidance office by September 29 @ 3:00 to be considered.

October 1, 2014

Must be turned in to the WCHS Guidance Office for Consideration

Wendy’s High School Heisman

 

Who’s Eligible

 Should you or your students apply?

 Absolutely! If you are a high school senior—or if you teach or coach one—who’s dedicated to learning, performing, and leading—we’d love to hear from you.

 

The Wendy’s High School Heisman Program is looking for all types of high-achieving seniors from more than 29,000 public and private high schools within the U.S. We consider young men and women who participate in a wide range of sports and school and community activities. If you’re one of the 1.4 million high school athletes across the country that excels in the classroom, on the field, and within your school and community, apply now. Or if you’re a teacher, coach, counselor, or administrator, learn how to refer a student. And don’t forget to check out the program timeline for important application deadlines and dates.

 

Know what it takes: Student Eligibility Criteria

 To achieve award eligibility for the 2014 Wendy’s High School Heisman Program, students must be seniors during the 2014/2015 academic years, graduating with the class of 2015. Applicants must:

 Learn:

 Have a cumulative high school grade point average (GPA) of a B (3.0) or better.

 Perform:

 Participate in at least one of 27 eligible school-sponsored sports:

 1.Badminton

 2.Baseball

 3.Basketball

 4.Bowling

 5.Canoeing

 6.Competitive Spirit/Cheerleading

 7.Competitive Weight Lifting

 8.Crew

 9.Cross Country

 10.Equestrian

 11.Fencing

 12.Field Hockey

 13.Football

 14.Golf

 15.Gymnastics

 16.Ice Hockey

 17.Judo

 18.Lacrosse

 19.Skiing

 20.Soccer

 21.Softball

 22.Swimming and Diving

 23.Tennis

 24.Track and Field

 25.Volleyball

 26.Water Polo

 27.Wrestling

 Lead:

 Be a leader in school and in the community and serve as a role model for underclassman.

Apply Now at wendysheisman.com

2015 Horatio Alger Scholarship

Horatio Alger Kentucky Scholarship Program 8 $7,000 Scholarships Awarded Funded through the generosity of the Suzanne and Walter Scott Foundation The Horatio Alger Kentucky Scholarship Program provides financial assistance to students in the State of Kentucky who have exhibited integrity and perseverance in overcoming personal adversity and who aspire to pursue higher education.

·         Eligibility To be eligible to apply for the Horatio Alger Kentucky Scholarship, applicants must meet the following criteria:

·         Be enrolled full time as a high school senior in Kentucky;

·         be progressing normally toward graduation in spring/summer of 2015 with plans to enter a college in the United States no later than the fall following graduation Exhibit a strong commitment to pursue and complete a bachelor’s degree at an accredited non-profit public or private institution in the United States (students may start their studies at a two-year institution and then transfer to a four-year institution)

·         Demonstrate critical financial need ($55,000 or lower adjusted gross family income is required)

·         Be involved in co-curricular and community service activities

·         Display integrity and perseverance in overcoming adversity

·         Maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0

·         Be a resident of Kentucky; and Be a United States citizen - See more at: https://www.horatioalger.org/scholarships/program_kentucky.cfm#sthash.mkoWbLu5.dpuf

October 25, 2014

Jack Kent Cooke Foundation

College Scholarship Program

The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation College Scholarship Program is an undergraduate scholarship program available to high-achieving high school seniors with financial need who seek to attend the nation’s best four-year colleges and universities. College Scholars receive up to $40,000 per year, college planning support, ongoing advising, and the opportunity to network with the larger JKCF Scholar community. The application period is open from early September to early November. Up to 40 College Scholars are selected for this program each year.

Minimum Eligibility Requirements

At a minimum, applicants must:

·         Plan to graduate from a US high school in spring 2015

·         Intend to enroll in an accredited four-year college beginning in fall 2015

·         Earn a cumulative unweighted GPA of 3.5 or above

·         Receive standardized test scores in the top 15%: SAT combined critical reading and math score of 1200 or above and/or ACT composite score of 26 or above

·         Demonstrate significant unmet financial need. We will consider applicants with family income up to $95,000. However, we anticipate that a majority of scholarship recipients will be eligible to receive a Pell grant

Learn more about our scholarship programs at www.jkcf.org/scholarships or call 855-509-5253

College Scholarship Webinar

When:  September 9, 2014

Time:  4:00 pm (ET)

College Scholarship Twitter Chats

When:  October 1, 2014

Time:  2:00 – 3:00 pm (ET)

      and

When: October 13, 2014

Time:  5:00 – 6:00 pm (ET)

November  2014

Who is eligible?

Any young person who:

  • is in grades 5-12 as of November 4,
  • is a legal resident of any U.S. state or Washington, D.C.,
  • has engaged in a volunteer activity that occurred at least partly during the 12 months prior to the date of application, and
  • submits a completed application to a school counselor of an officially designated local organization by November 4.

What do honorees win?

  • Students chosen as Local Honorees receive a Certificate of Achievement from their schools or organizations. Those who qualify (50 hours of service for age 14 and younger, 100 hours for those older) also receive the President's Volunteer Service Award.
  • State Honorees receive an award of $1,000, an engraved silver medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip with a parent or guardian to Washington, D.C., for national recognition events.
  • National Honorees receive an additional award of $5,000, an engraved gold medallion, a crystal trophy for their schools or organizations, and a $5,000 grant from The Prudential Foundation for a non-profit, charitable organization of their choice.

What qualifications must be met?

The application must:

  • describe an individual's community service activity or an individual's significant leadership in a group activity that has taken place during the previous year,
  • be completed and submitted to a school principal or the head of an officially designated local organization by November 4, and
  • be certified by the school counsellor of a designated local organization.

Apply at spirit.prudential.com

 

November 4, 2014

Western KY University

“Cherry Presidential Scholarship”

 

Cherry Presidential Scholarship  (Admission application deadline is Nov. 15, 2014)

 

Competitively awarded. Applicants with a minimum 3.80 unweighted GPA and ACT composite of 31 (1360 SAT) who wish to be considered for this level of award must complete the application for admission by November 15, 2014 and the Honors College application by December 1, 2014.  Covers in-state tuition, $4090 on-campus housing allowance, $2274 meal allowance, and $1000 book allowance.  Participation in the Honors College is required.  Renewable with a 3.5 overall GPA and good standing in the Honors College.  Must maintain full-time enrollment.  Apply now for admission:  www.wku.edu/apply

 

*Your Honors College application serves as your application for the Cherry Presidential scholarship, if received by December 1, 2014.  Apply now.

 

More information on the Honors College at WKU can be found here.  The admission application for all other scholarships is January 15, 2015.

 

November 15, 2014

Southeastern KY Partnership Scholarship

The Southeastern Kentucky Partnership Scholarship is a competitive, full-tuition, room and board scholarship at Lindsey Wilson College. In order to receive the scholarship, students must meet the following requirements:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.0, and ACT of 18
  • Must be determined Federal Pell Grant eligible by the FAFSA
  • Completion of a standard admissions application to Lindsey Wilson College
  • Completion and submission of the FAFSA by January 25, 2015
  • Submission of a 1-2 page essay by April 1, 2015. Essay Topic: How would you describe a successful life? 

A total of three winners will be selected from the following 16 schools:  Barbourville, Bell, Clay, Corbin, Harlan, Harlan Co, Jackson, Knox, Lynn Camp, Middlesboro, North & South Laurel, Pineville, Rockcastle, Whitley and Williamsburg.

 

Questions contact Jessica Wethington @ wethingtonje@lindsey.edu.

Students who apply but are not selected for the Partnership Scholarship will receive an additional $1000 for competing.

 

April 15, 2015

Current Underclassmen Opportunities

Title

Criteria/Info.

Deadline

Who is eligible?

Any young person who:

  • is in grades 5-12 as of November 4,
  • is a legal resident of any U.S. state or Washington, D.C.,
  • has engaged in a volunteer activity that occurred at least partly during the 12 months prior to the date of application, and
  • submits a completed application to a school counselor of an officially designated local organization by November 4.

What do honorees win?

  • Students chosen as Local Honorees receive a Certificate of Achievement from their schools or organizations. Those who qualify (50 hours of service for age 14 and younger, 100 hours for those older) also receive the President's Volunteer Service Award.
  • State Honorees receive an award of $1,000, an engraved silver medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip with a parent or guardian to Washington, D.C., for national recognition events.
  • National Honorees receive an additional award of $5,000, an engraved gold medallion, a crystal trophy for their schools or organizations, and a $5,000 grant from The Prudential Foundation for a non-profit, charitable organization of their choice.

What qualifications must be met?

The application must:

  • describe an individual's community service activity or an individual's significant leadership in a group activity that has taken place during the previous year,
  • be completed and submitted to a school principal or the head of an officially designated local organization by November 4, and

be certified by the school counsellor of a designated local organization.

 

Apply at spirit.prudential.com

 

 

November 4, 2014

ATTN:  Current Sophomore Students

 

Roger’s Scholars Program

 

 

 

Rogers Scholars

 

 

Rogers Scholars—The Center for Rural Development’s flagship youth program—provides leadership and college scholarship opportunities to help rising high school juniors in Southern and Eastern Kentucky develop the skills they need to seize their potential as the region’s next generation of business and entrepreneurial leaders.

 

During this intensive week-long program, Rogers Scholars work on building their leadership skills, participating in a series of team-building exercises; receive hands-on instructional training from professional experts in engineering, healthcare, and video production; and interact with nationally recognized business leaders and entrepreneurs.

 

Most of the activities take place on the campus of The Center in Somerset, Ky. High school students apply during their sophomore year and, if selected, will attend one of two Rogers Scholars summer sessions just before they enter the 11th grade. The program is presented tuition-free to students within The Center’s 45-county primary service region.

 

Since the program’s inception in 1998, more than 782 high school students have graduated from Rogers Scholars, and potential scholarships valued at more than $7.2 million have been offered to graduates by 18 participating colleges and universities.

 

The program, named after U.S. Congressman Harold “Hal” Rogers (KY-05), continues his goal that no young person should have to leave home to find his or her future.

 

Discover why the Rogers Scholars program has been described by graduates as “the experience of a lifetime.”

 

For more information about Rogers Scholars or to download an application, visit www.centeryouthprograms.com.

For more information about Rogers Scholars or to download an application, visit www.centeryouthprograms.com

ATTN:  Current Sophomore Students

HOBY’s flagship program, the State Leadership Seminar (LS) is designed to help high school sophomores to recognize their leadership talents and apply them to become effective, ethical leaders in their home, school, workplace and community. Selected students attend our three- or four-day seminars and participate in hands-on leadership activities, meet leaders in their state, and explore their own personal leadership skills while learning how to lead others and make a positive impact in their community. The seminar curriculum is based on the Social Change Model of Leadership and develops leadership from three perspectives: Personal Leadership, Group Leadership, and Leadership for Society.

 See more at: http://www.hoby.org/leadership-seminars#sthash.6dxLhVMd.dpuf

See more at:

 

http://www.hoby.org/leadership-seminars#sthash.6dxLhVMd.dpuf

Governor’s Scholars Program

 

Eligibility & Requirements

 

To be eligible for nomination and selection, a student must:

 Be in the 11th grade at a Kentucky public or private school at the time of selection and intend to return to a Kentucky school district for the next school term (Students skipping their senior year to enter college are not eligible);

Be a current resident of Kentucky;

Have taken the ACT, PSAT, or SAT in the 9th, 10th or 11th grades.

 

Students must complete an application and be nominated by their school districts or private schools to be considered for admission.

For more information visit. www.gsp.ky.gov

Must be turned in to Mrs. Britney Faulkner, Counselor at Whitley County High School.

 

Deadline:  December 1, 2014

Governor’s School for the Arts

Kentucky’s heritage of art and artists is unparalleled, just like the commitment of The Kentucky Center Governor’s School for the Arts to Kentucky’s next generation of young artists.

Every summer for the past twenty-seven years, GSA and our faculty of professional artist/educators have guided over two hundred of Kentucky’s finest young artists through three weeks of incredibly intense (and incredibly fun) arts instruction (since 2014, on the campus of Centre College in Danville). GSA auditions promising high school sophomores and juniors in nine different arts disciplines: Architecture, Creative Writing, Dance, Drama, Instrumental Music, Musical Theatre, New Media, Visual Art and Vocal Music.

For three solid weeks, the students live, breathe, eat and sleep the arts. It’s a thrilling, often life-changing experience, as they meet new friends, explore their creativity, and discover new things about who they are and who they can be in the future.

What does GSA cost students? Not a dime. GSA is free to all students selected for the program. GSA pays the entire cost of $3,800 per student through the General Assembly under the leadership of the Governor, along with donations from individuals, corporations and private foundations.

The truth is, GSA creates opportunities far beyond arts instruction. Here are some facts about GSA alumni:

  • 97% go on to college
  • 99% earn scholarships
  • GSA Alumni average total scholarship value = $59,000
  • GSA alumni score 7.4 points higher on the ACT than the national average

Graduates of the summer program are eligible for a host of scholarships and educational opportunities in all fields of study. Representatives from as many as 70 colleges and universities from across the country audition and interview graduates in the fall during GSA’s College and Career Day. Students can meet with representatives from such prestigious programs as the Savannah College of Art and Design and the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, along with great programs from the University of Kentucky, the University of Louisville, Transylvania University, Morehead State University, Bellarmine University, Centre College, Eastern Kentucky University, Western Kentucky University, and many more. Plus, twenty four colleges and universities welcome GSA alums with scholarships, just for having completed the program.

 

For Program Details and Deadlines visit

 

http://www.kentuckygsa.org/general-information/about-us/

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Federal Aid First.  Photo of student riding a bicycle on campus.  U.S. Department of Education logo.

Seniors:  Here’s some great information about frequently asked questions concerning federal student aid…visit

http://www.federalstudentaid.ed.gov/federalaidfirst/index.html

 

Senior Parents

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: *The Thin White Envelope: How to Help Your Teen Handle College Rejection

Rejection—no matter what your age—is tough. But for a senior who had his or her hopes pinned on a dream college, rejection can really sting.

Some universities are extremely selective. For example, Stanford University just announced that it sent offers to just 7.2% of its class of 2014 applicants! That means that 92.8% of those applicants received rejection letters.

If your student was not accepted by his or her dream school, here are some thoughts to share:

1.    Don’t take the decision personally. College admissions officials must bring together a diverse group of entering freshmen. Diversity includes, among other things, geographical area, extracurricular activities, and academic interests.

2.    The college may not have been a good match for you. In fact, maybe the admissions officer saw something that showed the college would not be a good fit for your personal skills, interests, and talents.

3.    Remember all your strengths. The right college will recognize and reward you with an acceptance.

4.    You aren't alone. Most students receive at least one rejection letter.

5.    Recognize that attending big name College X doesn't guarantee success. There are many paths to a great college experience and future career.

While it’s heart-breaking to see your teenager disappointed, college rejections happen. But they don’t have to define the rest of your student’s life. Discuss options with your teenager for the upcoming year. A few ideas might include:

1.    Accepting a second- or third-choice college.

2.    Attending a community college for a year or two and then reapplying to a 4-year college. Doing this is a great way to save money and complete transferable classes, and in the end, that final diploma comes from the 4-year college.

3.    Taking a “gap” year and working, volunteering, and/or completing an internship.

4.    Using the year to beef up credentials. Your student could retake the ACT, learn a language, or add new skills that set him or her apart to re-apply next year.

5.    Appealing to the college if new information is available (for example, maybe your student’s grades went up dramatically or he or she won a major competition since applying to the college). Note: A student shouldn’t appeal a college’s decision simply because he or she was disappointed. There must be compelling new information that was not available at the time of application.

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Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: *College Planning Tips … For Parents

Even if you attended college, preparing your teenager for college today is a whole new ball game. These strategies will help you support your student’s academic journey.

  • First, remember that you know your child best and you are his or her best advocate. When others may not believe in your child, you will. And when others don’t know or understand your child, you do. So your participation is critical.
  • Get involved and show your interest, the earlier the better. Encouraging your child is important, and so is connecting with teachers and counselors. Both appreciate parental involvement, and it also shows your child that you care.
  • Ask questions and find experts as your student prepares for and goes through college. Look for resources in your community—at school or a religious or civic group—that support education. And ask questions of college staff when your child begins the college search and application process.
  • Learn about financial aid. Check out reputable sources for information. Your student’s high school counselor can help you figure out where to find information. Visit ACT’s The Cost of Education site for more information.
  • Don’t worry if your child leaves for college without a declared major. It can be beneficial for students to learn more about personal preferences and abilities and to explore what majors of study are available first.
  • Help your student find a good “match” college. Instead of looking for the “perfect” college, encourage searching for a good match.
  • Check out the college’s career advising center and ask about opportunities for students to discover their career interests, take part in internships, find professional mentors and learn more about careers. Beginning as a freshman, encourage your son or daughter to regularly make these visits.
  • Be supportive and encouraging. Even when you don’t know the answer to a particular problem, reassuring your child that you’re behind him or her can make the difference between giving up and pushing forward.

 

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Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: *Academic Checklist: How Your Teen Can Get the Most out of High School

Whether you’re the parent of a junior high school student preparing for high school or are sending your senior off to college, the tips below will help make college planning much easier. To read more, please visit ACT’s college planning checklist.

Your Freshman Should:

  • Plan challenging high school courses
  • Find out why he or she might want to go to college
  • Become familiar with college entrance requirements
  • Take EXPLORE®—a set of four tests that measure academic achievement; EXPLORE results can provide planning information
  • Join/continue extracurricular activities now and throughout high school
  • Attend summer camp at a college to experience a college-like atmosphere
  • Meet with his or her college/career counselor regularly, now and throughout high school

Your Sophomore Should:

  • Continue to take and plan challenging high school courses
  • Think about what kind of education/training different careers require
  • Take PLAN and review the results with you and the school counselor; compare these to his or her EXPLORE results to measure growth
  • Start collecting college information
  • Visit colleges and talk with college students
  • Consider the reasons for going to college and how they relate to his or her career interests

Your Junior Should:

  • Continue to take and plan challenging courses and earn good grades
  • Join an academic club and complete community service projects
  • Register for the ACT; your son or daughter should be academically ready to take it by spring
  • List, compare, and visit colleges
  • Start or update an academic resume
  • Investigate scholarship opportunities
  • Volunteer for activities and clubs related to career interests
  • Get a part-time job, apprenticeship, or internship; or job shadow in a profession

Your Senior Should:

  • Complete and file the FAFSA as soon as possible after January 1
  • Visit colleges that have invited him or her to enroll
  • Keep track of and observe deadlines for sending in all required fees and paperwork
  • Continue to look for scholarship opportunities and keep track of important financial aid deadlines
  • Watch for the Student Aid Report (SAR)—it should arrive soon after the FAFSA is filed
  • Compare financial aid packages from different schools

 

GoHigher Kentucky Planner Timeline

12th Grade/Senior Year

Fall Semester

August/September:  Review your high school transcript. Will you meet all graduation and college entrance requirements?

§  Narrow your list of schools; request catalogues and admissions information.

§  Register for October SAT and/or ACT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Sign up for ACT or SAT prep courses.

October:

§  Review admissions applications; begin writing essays (if required).

§  Meet with college admissions representatives or schedule visits to schools you are interested in attending. Talk with students and staff.

§  Register for December ACT and/or SAT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Attend college fairs and financial aid nights.

§  Request recommendations from teachers, employers, and guidance counselors.

§  If applying for Early Decision, send in application.

November:

§  If you haven't already, register for December ACT and/or SAT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Watch for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) that will be available from your high school counselor, the financial aid office of the school you plan to attend, or www.fafsa.ed.gov.

§  Continue working on application essays.

§  Begin preparing your college applications.

§  Watch scholarship deadlines.

December:

§  Register for January SAT and/or February ACT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Finalize application essays and complete the admissions procedures for your top school choices.

§  Remind your references of application deadlines. Send thank-you notes to these people.

§  Mail all applications or turn them in to your high school, depending on the system your school uses.

§  Keep copies of all admissions applications.

  • If you plan on going to college and plan on filing your FAFSA On-line then go ahead and apply for a PIN# The Personal Identification Number (PIN) serves as your electronic signature and provides access to your personal information in various U.S. Department of Education systems. It's like the Personal Identification Number (PIN) that you get from your bank that enables you to access your account.

 

  • You can apply at Federal Student Aid's PIN Web site, www.pin.ed.gov, by selecting Apply for a PIN. Students and parents of dependent students who have not previously applied for a PIN are able to apply for a PIN within the FAFSA application. Once you successfully complete a request, we will e-mail or mail you a PIN, depending on whether you and your parents provided us with an e-mail address. It will take approximately 1-3 business days after you request your PIN for you to receive an e-mail notification with instructions on how to retrieve it electronically, or 7-10 days to receive it in the mail via the U.S. Postal Service.
  • THEN, be sure to go back to this site, www.pin.ed.gov, once you have received your PIN#, and ACTIVATE your PIN number.  From the time you receive your PIN, you will have 7 - 10 days to activate it, or it will be blocked.  Once activated it will remain active for 18 months.

 

 

Spring Semester

 

January:

 

 

 

If accepted for Early Decision, withdraw other applications.

§  Gather the information necessary to complete the FAFSA.  EVERYONE is being encouraged to file the FAFSA Online via the internet.  This speeds up the process of verifying your qualification for federal and state financial aid.  Submit as soon as possible after January 1.

§  Keep copies of all financial aid applications.

February: Register for March SAT and/or April ACT. This may be your LAST CHANCE to earn your full KEES scholarship award. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Obtain a physical examination. Forward to each school requiring a physical exam as a condition of admission.

§  Review college acceptances and compare with financial aid offers.

§  Make sure that mid-year transcripts have been sent to the school to which you have applied if required.

§  Gather the information necessary to complete the FAFSA.  If you expect any financial assistance from either State or Federal Sources you must file a FAFSA (Free Application For Student Aid).  This can be done via the internet or by using a paper application.  See your counselor for a paper application or visit http://federalstudentaid.ed.gov  EVERYONE is being encouraged to file the FAFSA Online via the internet.  This speeds up the process of verifying your qualification for federal and state financial aid.  Submit as soon as possible after January 1.

§  Keep copies of all financial aid applications

March:

§  Register for May SAT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Make a final decision about a school. Send in a deposit and notify other schools of your decision.

§  Request course descriptions and schedules from the school you have chosen.

§  Watch for your Student Aid Report (SAR); review it for accuracy.

April:

§  Register for June SAT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Confirm housing arrangements. If necessary, send in deposits.

§  Research Advanced Placement (AP) or College Level Examinations Program (CLEP) exams.

§  If you do not qualify for need-based aid or need additional financial assistance, consider other sources such as loans, work-study, or cooperatives.

May:

§  Register for June ACT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Complete AP examinations.

§  Submit scholarship acceptance forms.

§  Make sure you have returned all financial aid award notices.

§  Plan to attend freshman orientation and registration.

June:

 

§  Make sure your final transcript is sent to the school you will be attending.

§  College can be expensive. A summer job can help pay some of your expenses.

Summer After Senior Year

July:

§  Make a list of what you will need to take with you for your dorm room.

§  If you haven't met your roommate, call, write, or e-mail to get acquainted.

August:

§  Make sure housing documentation is quickly accessible when you move into the dorm.

§  Review a campus map. Learn how to get around at your new school.

§  Buy your books and supplies after the first class meeting.

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GoHigher Kentucky Planner Timeline

11th Grade/Junior Year

Fall Semester

 

August:

§  Start your year off right: Talk with your guidance counselor about your options and your plans. Be sure to ask about test dates for the PSAT, ACT, and SAT. You'll need to register up to six weeks ahead of time.

§  Sign up for courses with your eyes on the prize: college and money to pay for it! A tougher course load may pay off with scholarships and may get you a better chance to get admitted to the school of your choice.

§  Start investigating private and public sources for financial aid. Take note of scholarship deadlines and plan accordingly.

§  Sign up for activities to boost your college applications.


September:

§  Find out about schools you are interested in attending. Treat your school selection process like a research paper: Make a file and gather information about schools, financial aid, and campus life to put in it. Go to college fairs and open houses and learn as much as you can from the Internet about schools.

§  Begin planning college visits. Fall, winter, and spring break are good times because you can observe a campus when classes are going on.


October:

§  Sign up to take the PSAT IF you are interested in being in the running for the National Merit Scholarship OR if you need a test score for your application to the Governor’s Scholars Program this year  . You'll get the results by Christmas.

§  Sign up for ACT or SAT prep courses. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Do your top college picks require essays or recommendations? Now is the time to begin planning your essays and choosing whom you'd like to ask for a recommendation.

November:

§  Applications for the Governor's Scholars Program are available in your guidance counselor's office. The program offers high school juniors a taste of college life.

§  Sign up for the ACT and SAT, if you haven't already.

§  You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

December:

§  Begin the application process for service academies (West Point, Annapolis, etc.)

§  Decide if you should take AP exams in May. Investigate the CLEP program.

Spring Semester

January:

§  Meet with your guidance counselor again to develop your senior schedule.

§  Organize your Individual Graduation Plan.


February:

 

§  Think about lining up a summer job, internship, or co-op.

§  Plan campus visits for spring break.

§  Memorize your Social Security number if you haven't already. It will be your identity on campus.


March/April:

§  Get ready for AP exams next month.

§  Write a resume.


May:

§  May 1 is the last day for students to accept or decline their Governor's Scholars appointments.

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☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻

GoHigher Kentucky Planner Timeline

10th Grade/Sophomore Year

 

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♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

GoHigher Kentucky Planner Timeline

9th Grade/Freshman Year


Remember, you will have more options if you start planning now for college and do your best to earn good grades.

 

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Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: MCj03983550000[1]Getting Admitted To A College or University

You've decided to get a higher education and you know which school you want to attend. What next?

·         Get an application for admission from the school's admissions office or Web site, or apply online at GoHigher Kentucky. Complete and return the application. Pay attention to deadlines.

·         Make arrangements to have your high school transcript sent to the school. Get a housing application if you're going to live on campus and submit it as soon as possible. Find out about deposits, orientations, and registering for classes. After you've been accepted, notify the school of your decision and let the other schools you've applied to know you won't attend.

·         If you have questions or don't understand something, ask your parents, guidance counselor, or the admissions director at the college.

·         Find out what tests are required and the deadlines for submitting the results. Be sure to confirm this information with the school. If you've taken the required tests, check with the school to make sure it has your results. It's up to you to make sure you've taken the correct tests and that the results have been reported.

·         Some schools use an enrollment contract to explain what you can expect them to give you for your money. Read the contract carefully before you sign it. A representative of the school may promise you things that aren't in the contract, such as help finding a job. If the representative makes you a promise, ask him or her to write the promise on the contract and sign and date it. A promise is usually not enforceable in court unless it's in writing.

 

Early Decision and Early Action

·         In Early Decision, you make a commitment to enroll in a school if you are admitted. You have to withdraw all other applications and make a nonrefundable deposit by a date well before May 1. One possible disadvantage to Early Decision is that it may mean you don't have any leverage in negotiating a better financial aid package from the school you choose.

·         With Early Action, you apply to your preferred school and receive a decision before the normal response date. You don't have to enroll at the institution or make a deposit before May 1.

·         For more information, including deadline and notification dates, contact the admissions office of the school you are interested in attending.

 

College Information

AEC Southern Ohio College

Alice Lloyd College

Asbury College

Ashland Community and Technical College

Beckfield College

Bellarmine University

Berea College

Bluegrass Technical & Community College

Bowling Green Technical College

Brescia University

Campbellsville University

Central Kentucky Technical College

Centre College

Cumberland College

Daymar Colege

Draughons Junior College

Eastern Kentucky University

Elizabethtown Technical College

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Gateway Community and Technical College

Georgetown College

Hazard Community College

Henderson Community College

Hopkinsville Community College

Indiana Wesleyan University

ITT Technical Institute

Jefferson Community College

Jefferson Technical College

Kentucky Christian College

Kentucky Mountian Bible College

Kentucky State University

Kentucky Wesleyan College

Lindsey Wilson College

Louisville Technical Institute

Madisonville Community College

Mayo Technical College

Maysville Community College

McKendree College

Mid-Continent College

Midway College

Morehead State University

Murry State University

National College of Business and Technology

Northern Kentucky University

Northwood University

Owensboro Community and Technical College

Paducah Technical College

Pikeville College

Prestonsburg Community College

RETS Institute of Technology

Saint Catharine College

Somerset Community College

Southeast Community College

Southwestern College of Business

Spalding University

Spencerian College

Sullivan University

Thomas More College

Transylvania University

Union College

University of Kentucky

University of Louisville

West Kentucky Community and
Technical College

Western Kentucky University

 

 

·         Campus Tours
Providing fast and easy access to the interactive tours of colleges across the US!

 

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Prepare for College

 

Education past high school can be as much or as little as you want! Trade school, technical school, and two-year or four-year college degrees are all options past high school.

Going to school after graduation may be the last thing you want to hear about. But attending college after you earn your high school diploma increases your job opportunities, your earning power, and your ability to enjoy a better life.

Get a bachelors degree and you can make almost $21,180 a year more than your friends with just a high school diploma.

Do the math: $21,180 times a 30-year career equals over half a million dollars! ($635,400 to be exact). Even if you don't like math, you have to love that!

Information from the U.S. Census shows earnings increase with higher education:

You already know pursuing more education or training can mean more money in salary over your lifetime. So what else is holding you back from a plan for your future?

My grades aren't good enough for college.

Good grades are important. Better grades can mean a better chance to get into the school and program of your choice. Good grades can also mean money for college. As a Kentuckian, each year you make at least a 2.5 GPA, you are eligible for a Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES).

But colleges don't just look at grades and test scores when making admission decisions, either. Extracurricular activities, talent in arts or sports, and community service can also play a part in their decision. So, you aren't going to be the valedictorian next year? Plenty of successful college students weren't either!

I don't know what I want to be when I grow up ... But I know I don't want to ...

If you know what you don't like, chances are you know what you DO like. Talk with people whose careers or jobs interest you, asking where they went to school and what they thought of the program they took. Ask your parents, guidance counselor, or librarian for help in your career quest. Check out the Occupational Outlook Handbook or the Kentucky Occupational Outlook report. You can access the handbook online at www.bls.gov/oco/home.htm, or Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: This links to a PDF documentdownload the report.

Tech school, community college, private college, or university? Which would be best for me?

Again, talk with your parents, guidance counselor, or anyone in a career you think you'd like. Ask what school they attended. Develop a list of schools you are interested in and contact them for more information. What tests and qualifications are required for admission? Know your options!

I can't afford it.

Most college students and their families don't write a check for their college education. Financial aid is available and is based on your family's ability to pay for college. Besides, after looking at how much more an education can pay you over a lifetime, how can you NOT afford it? Talk with your high school guidance counselor. Read Affording Higher Education, a KHEAA book that lists 3,200 financial aid sources available to Kentucky students. It's available at www.kheaa.com.

Every plan has to have its first steps. Once you decide what general career direction you want to pursue, meet with your guidance counselor to discuss what classes to take to fit into your higher education goals.

What about...

You should be familiar with your Individual Graduation Plan, which you have reviewed each year with your guidance counselor. To pursue a Kentucky college education, you must meet the Precollege Curriculum requirements.

Bonus high school courses

Dual credit courses count for both high school and college credit. They can save you time and money in pursuing your education goals, so they are worth checking out. Visit the Kentucky Virtual High School's Discover College Online for more information.

CLEP program

The College-Level Examination Program offers more than 30 tests for subjects often taken during the first two college years. Many colleges use CLEP scores to award college credit. Some private industries, businesses, and other groups use CLEP scores to satisfy requirements for licensing, advancement, and admissions to training programs.

Commonwealth Diploma

A Commonwealth Diploma is awarded to seniors who complete 22 credit units, meet all minimum requirements of the Precollege Curriculum, and who get a grade of "C" or better in four Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) courses in English, science, and a foreign language, plus another AP/IB course. Students must also complete three AP or IB exams in those subject areas.

These courses could also count as dual credit for both high school graduation and college.

Check with both your high school guidance counselor and the colleges you are interested in attending for more information. AP or IB courses may also be available through the Kentucky Virtual High School, independent study, or a college or university.

Institutional challenge exam

You can also take a test to prove you are proficient in a subject matter at a higher education institution. If you can pass the test, you can get credit for the course without having taken (or even paid) for it. Ask the colleges you are considering if this option is available.

Tech classes

Interested in a technical field like welding, information technology, health science, or carpentry? You may want to take technical education classes offered at 53 Kentucky area technology centers. Most Kentucky Tech credits will transfer to the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS).

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Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: j0303470   Testing

 

PLAN (10TH Grade)

TEST DATE:  Fall ( Date Sept. 18)

The PLAN® program helps 10th graders build a solid foundation for future academic and career success and provides information needed to address school districts' high-priority issues. It is a comprehensive guidance resource that helps students measure their current academic development, explore career/training options, and make plans for the remaining years of high school and post-graduation years.

PLAN can help all students—those who are college-bound as well as those who are likely to enter the workforce directly after high school.

As a "pre-ACT" test, PLAN is a powerful predictor of success on the ACT. At the same time, many schools recognize the importance of PLAN testing for all students, as it focuses attention on both career preparation and improving academic achievement.

Typically, PLAN is administered in the fall of the sophomore year.

 

PSAT (11th Grade)

About PSAT/NMSQT

TEST DATE:  Fall ( Date Oct. 15th)

The Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test is a co-sponsored program by the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation.

PSAT/NMSQT stands for Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test.  It’s a standardized test that provides firsthand practice for the SAT Reasoning Test.  It also gives you a chance to enter National Merit Scholarship Corporation Scholarship programs.

The PSAT/NMSQT measures:

·         Critical reading skills

·         Math problem-solving skills

·         Writing skills

You have developed these skills over many years, both in and out of school.  This test doesn’t require you to recall specific facts from your classes.

The most common reasons for taking the PSAT/NMSQT are:

·         To receive feedback on your strengths and weaknesses on skills necessary for college study.  You can then focus your preparation on those areas that could most benefit from additional study or practice.

·         To see how your performance on an admissions test might compare with that of others applying to college.

·         To enter the competition for scholarships from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation (grade 11).

·         To help prepare for the SAT.  You can become familiar with the kinds of questions and the exact directions you will see on the SAT.

Scores & Review

Information on the Score Report

The PSAT/NMSQT score reports provide three different scores a scale of 20 to 80: One each for the critical reading, mathematics, and writing skills sections. The average critical reading, math, and writing skills score for students in eleventh grade is about 49.

Also listed on your score report is the Selection Index, which is used to determine eligibility in National Merit Scholarship Corporation programs (NMSC). It is the sum of the three scores in each test section (CR + M + W). The Selection Index ranges from 60 to 240. The average Selection Index for students in eleventh grade is about 147. Note: Only students in eleventh grade are eligible to enter NMSC scholarship programs.

Finally, score reports include national percentiles, which allow you to compare your scores with other students in your grade level who have taken the PSAT/NMSQT. If you take the PSAT/NMSQT in the eleventh grade, you receive junior percentiles. If you take the PSAT/NMSQT in tenth grade or younger, you will receive sophomore percentiles. For example, a student in eleventh grade with a percentile of 53 has earned a score better than 53 out of every 100 college-bound juniors who took the test. Go to Score Report Plus for more information about your score report.

 

 

ACT (Any grade, but recommended grade 11 and/or 12) Kentucky’s State-Sponsored ACT Administration for Juniors is March 3rd at WCHS

Most colleges in Kentucky require you to take some kind of entrance test before you are admitted. The two most common tests are the ACT Assessment and the SAT.

The ACT Assessment is required or accepted at all public and private colleges, community colleges, and universities in Kentucky. It contains multiple-choice questions in four sections-English, math, reading, and science reasoning. The scores range from 1 to 36. For more information, visit www.act.org.

 

Test Dates in the U.S., U.S. Territories, and Canada

Test dates in other countries

2012–2013

2013–2014

2014–2015

Test Date

Registration Deadline

(Late Fee Required)

September 13, 2014

August 8, 2014

August 9–22, 2014

October 25, 2014

September 19, 2014

September 20–October 3, 2014

December 13, 2014

November 7, 2014

November 8–21, 2014

February 7, 2015*

January 9, 2015

January 10–16, 2015

April 18, 2015

March 13, 2015

March 14–27, 2015

June 13, 2015

May 8, 2015

May 9–22, 2015

 

Free ACT PracticeNeed to practice for the ACT?  There are several good tools you can use for this, but one of the easiest is located at the link below, and it’s completely FREE >

 

http://www.actstudent.org/sampletest/index.html

 

 

At this web-address you can practice short sample sets of questions.  This site is available free of charge and you are not required to set up an account or enter any vital personal information.

 

Also available for your use, located in the WCHS Library, there are several ACT practice CD’s.  Just check one out and practice here at one of the computer stations in the Library.  (See Mrs. Anderson or Mr. Halcomb for check-out)

 

Each ACT registration packet has an ACT Practice Booklet included.  This practice test can be taken and give you a good estimate of how you might score on the actual test.

 

Here are some additional sites you might try:

 

http://www.testprepreview.com/act_practice.htm

http://www.4tests.com/exams/examdetail.asp?eid=13

http://www.testpreppractice.net/ACT/Free-Online-ACT-Practice-Tests.aspx

 

 

 

SAT

The SAT is accepted at most public and private institutions. The SAT I is made up of seven sections: three verbal, three math, and one "equating" section. The equating section does not count toward your final score. But you won't know which section it is, so treat all sections the same. A score from 200 to 800 is possible on each section. For more information or to register, visit www.collegeboard.com/sat/html/students/indx001.html. The SAT II consists of one-hour tests in specific subjects. Check with the school you plan to attend to see if it's required. For more information or to register, visit www.collegeboard.com/sat/html/students/prep005.html.

Test Dates & Fees

SAT Test Dates

For 2014-15 Test Dates visit http://sat.collegeboard.org/SAT/public/pdf/sat-sat-subject-tests-dates.pdf

 

COMPASS

The COMPASS Test is an ACT product used by some community colleges and higher education institutions as a placement tool and may be used by some schools as an entrance exam in place of the ACT. 

The ACT Computerized Adaptive Placement Assessment and Support System (COMPASS) is a series of tests in mathematics, reading, writing skills, and English as a second language which helps pinpoint strengths and weaknesses in particular areas. COMPASS is on the KCTCS approved list of tests. For more information, visit www.act.org/compass/index.html.

 

ASVAB

 

TEST DATE:  Whitley County High School will be administering the ASVAB for Grade 11 students and for select Grade 12 students.  December 3, 4, 5

The ASVAB is the most widely used multiple-aptitude test battery in the world.

The ASVAB was originally designed to predict future academic and occupational success in military occupations. Since its introduction in 1968, the ASVAB has been the subject of extensive research. Numerous validation studies indicate the ASVAB assesses academic ability and predicts success in a wide variety of occupations.

Several composite scores are formed from different combinations of ASVAB test scores. Three composites, or Career Exploration Scores, are provided specifically to help students engage in career exploration. These scores help students to get a good sense of their verbal, math, and science and technical skills compared to other students in the same grade. ASVAB results are reported to students and counselors on the ASVAB Summary Results sheet. This report shows grade-specific, gender-specific, and combined standard scores and score bands for all eight tests and three Career Exploration Scores. It also provides students with percentile-based interpretations of those scores. The ASVAB Summary Results sheet provides students with appropriate explanations of the scores, as well as suggestions for their use.

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Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: crest.pngWHITLEY COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL PROFILE Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: colonelblk.jpg

2014-2015

INTRODUCTION

Founded in 1963, Whitley County High School was born through the merger of four older county high schools.  Nestled on a beautiful 173 acre tract of land in southern Whitley County, the campus is home to a newly renovated, state of the art main building and the addition of a brand new 20,000 square foot freshman academy.  This school serves the students of Southeastern Kentucky with a quality college preparatory education as well as providing opportunities for those students wishing to pursue technical, vocational, and/or military training.  The facilities not only serve the students but are extensively used by the community.  The campus boasts a walking track, outdoor classroom/nature/fitness trail, amphitheater, football, softball, and baseball fields, six tennis courts and a sand volleyball court. 

Whitley County High School observes a traditional six-period day and takes pride in offering a challenging curriculum which includes Advanced Placement, Honors and Dual Credit Courses.  WCHS has 78 full-time teachers, 3 guidance counselors, 2 community counselors, 2 librarians, a youth service center coordinator and a school resource officer.  Average class size is 24.  Current student population is 1156; the senior class number is 233.

G.P.A.

G.P.A. is reported on a 4.0 point scale.  Students taking Advanced Placement courses will have their GPAs weighted:  A=5, B=4 and designated by “AP” on the transcript and grade reports.  Honors courses are not weighted but designated by “H” on the transcript and grade reports.  GRADING SCALE -  A: 100-91,   B: 90-81,   C: 80-71,   D: 70-65,   F: 64 and below

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES OFFERED (10)

Art                               Biology                             Calculus                         Chemistry

Computer Science      English Literature           English Language         Government

Spanish                       U.S. History

 

COLLEGE & DUAL CREDIT COURSES

University of the Cumberlands:  Junior and Senior students (who meet certain criteria) are afforded the opportunity to take classes on the campus of the University of the Cumberlands for a nominal fee.

Eastern Kentucky University:  Senior students (who meet certain criteria) are afforded the opportunity to take evening classes on the Corbin campus of Eastern Kentucky University for a nominal fee.

KCTCS:  Students involved in several of our vocational programs have opportunity to earn credit through KCTCS.

 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Students are required to take a minimum of six courses each semester, and they must have at least twenty-two credits to graduate.  Classes meet five times per week for 55 minutes class periods.  .

General Track

Pre-College Track

4- English Credits

English I

English II

English III

English IV

 

3- Math Credits

Algebra I

Geometry

Algebra II

A Senior Math Class

 

3-Science Credits

Physical Science

Biology

Chemistry

 

3- Social Studies Credits

Integrated Social Studies

World Civilization

U.S. History

 

½ credits

Health

Physical Education

 

1- Credit

Visual & Performing Arts

 

7 Elective Credits

4- English Credits

English I

English II

English III

English IV

 

3- Math Credits

Algebra I

Geometry or Hon. Geom

Algebra II or Hon. Alg. II

A Senior Math Class

 

3-Science Credits

Physical Science

Biology or Hon. Bio.

Chemistry or Hon. Chem

 

3- Social Studies Credits

Integrated Social Studies

World Civilization

U.S. History

 

½ credits

Health

Physical Education

 

1- Credit

Visual & Performing Arts

 

2 Credits

Foreign Language (same)

 

5 Elective Credits

 

 

 

 

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Suicide Prevention Toolbox MC900431613[1]

MC910217459[1]

 

Please visit www.jasonfoundation.com

 

Warning Signs

http://jasonfoundation.com/youth-suicide/warning-signs/

 

Facts & Stats

http://jasonfoundation.com/youth-suicide/facts-stats/

 

Risk Factors

http://jasonfoundation.com/youth-suicide/risk-factors/

 

“A Friend Asks” App

http://jasonfoundation.com/get-involved/student/a-friend-asks-app/

 

Just for Parents

http://jasonfoundation.com/get-involved/parent/parent-and-community-seminar/

 

 

MC900434757[1]

 

If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide - call