12th grade | 11th grade | 10th grade | 9th grade | College | Testing | Profile | Scholarships|UnderclassmenOpportunities

Welcome to the Counselor's Corner

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MC900156753[1]Check the District Webpage for the 2014-2015 school calendar.

January 1:  College-bound seniors:  Be sure to file your FAFSA as soon as possible after January 1, 2015. 

February 18, 2015 Rescheduled for Feb. 26 or 27 weather permitting:  Senior “Career Prep” Students will be given the WorkKeys – Career Readiness Test.  Certificates earned from performance on this test may be used to help gain employment at certain industrial locations around the country.

 February 28, 2015:  Patriot Preview Day!  Are you interested in attending University of the Cumberlands?  There will be a College Preview Day on Feb. 28, 2015.  Registration will be from 9:30 until 10:00 a.m.  The different academic departments will have representatives available to answer questions on the upper concourse of the Rollins Center.  Athletic departments will also be available as well as Academic Affairs, Financial Planning, Student Services, Student Activities and Baptist Campus Ministries.  Please feel free to contact the Admissions office if you have any questions.  Call 606-539-4596 or visit go online to register at http://www.ucumberlands.edu/admissions/previewday/

March 3:  Statewide Junior Testing of the ACT given at WCHS.

 

Text Box: Here’s our guidance staff.  Please call, email or stop by if you have any question.

Our staff is here to assist all students and parents in having a successful high school experience.

Contact Mrs. Reynolds, HS Counselor at linda.reynolds@whitley.kyschools.us

Mrs. Reynolds’ office is located in the Freshman Academy Office Complex.  She is available to help all WCHS students but her primary responsibilities are freshman students and Electronic Computer School – Credit Recovery.

 
 


Mrs. Faulkner’s office is located in the Main Building Office Complex.  She is available to help all WCHS students, but is primarily responsible for tracking students with the last names beginning with A - K.

 
Contact Mrs. Faulkner, HS Counselor at britney.faulkner@whitley.kyschools.us

Contact Mr. Lowrie, HS Counselor at kevin.lowrie@whitley.kyschools.us

Mr. Lowrie’s office is located in the Main Building Office Complex.  He is available to help any WCHS student, but is primarily responsible for tracking students with the last names beginning with  L - Z.

 
 


Office Hours 7:15 - 3:30 

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Contact Angie Canada, Records Clerk at angela.canada@whitley.kyschools.us

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

What's the big deal about school anyway?

Can't I get a good job now?

Yes, maybe you can, but the statistics are against you.  Check out the earnings and unemployment rates from people 25 years and older in Kentucky with different levels of education:

Level of education completed

Unemployment rate in 2006

Median earnings in 2006

Less than a high school diploma

11.4%

$17,077

High school graduate, no college

6.3%

$25,288

Some college, no degree

5.4%

$28,625

Associate degree

3.4%

$30,047

Bachelor’s degree

2.1%

$40,925

Master’s Degree

1.8%

$48,642

Professional degree

1.5%

$66,032

Doctoral degree

1.3%

$83,649

Source:  2008 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Median Kentucky earnings by educational level for workers 25 or older employed full time; unemployment for workers 25 or older.

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Graph of median Kentucky earnings by educational level for workers 25 or older employed full time; unemployment for workers 25 or older.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Sometimes it’s hard to stay in school if you think you need to be working to earn money.  But, if you finish high school and go on to college, you’ll have a wider variety of jobs to choose from and you’ll earn more.

MC900156849[1]Workforce Kentucky

The Office of Employment and Training has developed a comprehensive labor market workforce information system called Workforce Kentucky.  The system is designed to serve employers, job seekers, students, counselors, educators and training providers.  This interactive Internet-based system can be accessed at www.workforcekentucky.ky.gov.  It is the largest source of labor market data in the commonwealth.  Users can explore occupations, labor markets, geographic areas, industry projections, and much more.  The following are brief explanations of the various types of information and reports available to the user.

Essential Skills to Getting a Job

This is good information for ALL students: Often referred to as "soft skills", work ethic, communication, teamwork and critical thinking are all must have's for youth in today's job market. http://www.dol.gov/odep/documents/essential_job_skills.pdf

MC900432637[1]Career Snapshots (videos)

Want to learn more about a particular career path (job)?  Visit this website http://www.careeronestop.org/Videos/CareerandClusterVideos/career-and-cluster-videos.aspx to watch short videos detailing the basics of a variety of jobs in America today.

Current Senior Scholarship & Program Opportunities

Title

Criteria

Deadline

 

“Bonner Scholar Program”

This is a “Community Service” program that has scholarship opportunities attached for LINDSEY WILSON COLLEGE ONLY. 

·         Students must complete a Bonner Application, obtain letters of recommendation and participate in on-campus interview.

·         Have a cumulative GPA above a 3.0.

·         Commit to 8-10 hours of direct service weekly at a site that fits the six commitments and attend the meetings assigned by Bonner Scholar Advisors.

·         Show that you are passionate about servant leadership.

See your guidance counselor for more details.

Visit www.lindsey.edu/bonner

              Buick Achievers

Scholarship Program

·         High School seniors

·         Those who plan to enroll full time at a 4-year college or university in 2015-16

·         Those who plan to major in a field of study that focuses on engineering, technology, design or business, with an interest in the automotive industry

February 27, 2015

Kentucky Farm Bureau Scholarship

ELIGIBILITY

 •have either a minimum 3.5 cumulative GPA (on a 4.0 scale) or a minimum 23 ACT score

•be the child of a Kentucky Farm Bureau member and remain such, while the scholarship is in force

•finish high school within the year they apply for the scholarship

•for the Leadership in Agriculture Scholarship, applicant’s parents must be actively engaged in production agriculture

www.kyfb.com/scholarships 

February 28, 2015

Civil Engineering Scholarships

Hello Educators!  Do you know a graduating senior who is interested in Engineering?  Math?  CAD?  Building structures or roadways?  If so, we have an exceptional scholarship opportunity available!  The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet offers two scholarship programs geared toward civil engineering.  These scholarships provide money for college, paid summer employment while in school, and full-time employment after college graduation.  This opportunity can’t be beat!!  Applications are now being accepted and the deadline is March 1.  Below you will find a brief description.  More details and the applications can be found on our website at http://transportation.ky.gov/Education/Pages/Scholarships.aspx. 

 

 The Civil Engineering Scholarship Program is for students interested in pursuing a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering at Western KY University, University of Louisville, or University of Kentucky.  Students can also take classes at other Kentucky state colleges/universities, with approved programs, before transferring to WKU, UofL, or UK.  Candidates must have an ACT composite score of 24 and maintain a GPA of 2.5 while in college.  College Freshmen and Sophomores currently receive $5750 a semester to apply towards tuition, books, etc.  Juniors and Seniors receive $6150 a semester.  Students are expected to work for the Cabinet upon graduation for each year they received a stipend.  This scholarship can be worth over $47,000!

 

The Civil Engineering Technology Program is for students interested in pursuing an associate’s degree in civil engineering technology at Big Sandy Community & Technical College in Prestonsburg and Blue Grass Community & Technical College in Lexington.  (We are currently working on developments to expand this program to western Kentucky.)  Candidates must meet the entrance qualifications for the college and maintain a GPA of 2.5.  Students receive $2750 a semester, and are expected to work for the Cabinet upon graduation for each year they received a stipend.

March 1, 2015

Upper Cumberland Counseling Association

“Human Services Scholarship”

·         Seniors

·         Plan to major in the area of human services:  Counseling, Sociology, Education. Psychology

March 1, 2015

State Farm Companies Foundation

“Good Neighbor Scholarship”

Who is eligible?

Applicants to the State Farm Good Neighbor Scholarship Program must meet all of the following criteria:

What will be awarded?

How do I apply?

When is the program deadline?

March 2, 2015

Sandi Curd

Leadership Tri-County

Scholarship

Applicant must be enrolled in an accredited school in Whitley County. (An equivalent ACT test score and comparable leadership skills for home/private students will be taken into consideration.)

Please write a brief essay (no more than one page) on what you have learned from these leadership positions and how the leadership skills you have acquired could be further utilized during your College/University studies.

Please attach 3 letters of recommendation.

Leadership Scholarships are $1,000.00 payable to the institution of your choice.

April 1, 2015

KY Federation of Republican Women Scholarship Program

Did you know that the KFRW offers a $1,000 scholarship to a high school senior girl? http://www.kentuckyrepublicanwomen.org/images/graduate-girl-sillouette.jpg

The Kentucky Federation of Republican Women (KFRW) seeks to grant one scholarship annually in the amount of $1000.00 to a college-bound high school senior girl who has been politically active within the Republican Party during her high school career. The qualified applicant will graduate from a Kentucky high school in 2014, is a registered Republican and plans to enroll at an accredited college or university in Kentucky.

The complete application will include the following:

·         Completed application form

·         A one-page typed essay about a Republican woman you admire or who has influenced your life and why

·         An official copy of your high school transcript – which may be mailed separately

·         Two letters of recommendation

To apply for our scholarship, print out and complete our scholarship application form

It can be downloaded on your computer and printed out for you to complete at your leisure. Our scholarship form uses the free, downloadable Adobe Reader program which allows you the convenience of completing the scholarship application from home or work. Download the free plug-in from Adobe's web site if it is not already installed on your system by clicking on the Adobe Reader picture below.

http://www.kentuckyrepublicanwomen.org/images/adobe-reader-download.gif

The completed application must be mailed to
KFRW Scholarship Chairman, Tina Fox no later than April 1, 2014.

April 1, 2015

KY Manufactured Housing Institute Scholarship

Eligible participants must live in modular or manufactured homes who desire to further his/her education. 

3 scholarships will be awarded in the amount of $1000

https://trimblecollegecareercenter.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/kmhi-flyer.jpg

April 1, 2015

Scholarship

Purpose:                   The KEDC Scholarship Fund awards scholarships to college (2

                                    or 4 year), technical or vocational bound students graduating 

                                    from a high school in a KEDC member district. 

Criteria:                    The recipient of the KEDC scholarship shall be held to the

                                    following criteria (scoring rubric Instruction Tab - Scholarships )

*    Maintain a grade point average (GPA) no lower than 3.0

*    Meet CPE (Council on Postsecondary Education System-wide Benchmarks or equivalents) ex. COMPASS or Kyote:

o   English                       18

o   Mathematics           19

o   Reading                     20

*    Write an essay demonstrating potential - (Why are you the best fit for this scholarship?)

*    Must demonstrate financial need; disclose other  scholarship awards (types and amounts)

*    Recipient is not required to declare any particular major (education, business, technology, etc.) to be an eligible applicant

Guidelines:              Scholarship will be awarded on an annual basis and is not

                                    renewable. Funds will be distributed to recipient based upon

                                    proof of higher education enrollment.

Amount:                   A scholarship will be awarded in the amount of $2,500, to be

                                    divided in two equal installments (once per semester).

April 1, 2015

Southeastern KY Partnership Scholarship

The Southeastern Kentucky Partnership Scholarship is a competitive, full-tuition, room and board scholarship at Lindsey Wilson College. In order to receive the scholarship, students must meet the following requirements:

A total of three winners will be selected from the following 16 schools:  Barbourville, Bell, Clay, Corbin, Harlan, Harlan Co, Jackson, Knox, Lynn Camp, Middlesboro, North & South Laurel, Pineville, Rockcastle, Whitley and Williamsburg.

Questions contact Jessica Wethington @ wethingtonje@lindsey.edu.

Students who apply but are not selected for the Partnership Scholarship will receive an additional $1000 for competing.

April 15, 2015

Current Underclassmen Opportunities

Title

Criteria/Info.

Deadline

Quest Bridge Scholarship Company


Selection Criteria

Current High School Juniors

QuestBridge takes all of the following factors into account when evaluating an application for the National College Match:

·         Academic Achievement

·         Financial Qualifications

·         Personal Circumstances

Academic Achievement

We seek students who have demonstrated a level of academic achievement that meets or exceeds the admissions standards of our partner colleges. The academic characteristics below are based on profiles of Finalists from previous years, and are not strict requirements or cut-offs:

Grades and rigor of high school curriculum: Primarily As in the most challenging courses at your high school (usually including Honors, AP, and/or IB level courses, if available.)

Class rank: Top 5-10% of your graduating class.

Standardized test scores: SAT (CR+M) scores above 1250; ACT composite score above 27. We also recommend submitting any AP, IB, or SAT Subject Test scores. Review the standardized testing requirements for each partner college.

We also look for evidence of strong writing ability, intellectual spark, and determination through essays and teacher/counselor recommendations.

Financial Qualifications

College Match Finalists typically come from households earning less than $60,000 annually for a family of four, and often less than $50,000. This is not a strict cut-off and we encourage students who feel they have faced significant financial hardship to review these financial details carefully to see if they may qualify.

All sources of family income are taken into account, including:

·         Salaries, wages, and tips

·         Business and farm income

·         Rental income

·         Interest and dividend income

·         Retirement distributions

·         Alimony

·         Child support received

See your counselor for more information.

March 25, 2015

Commonwealth Honors Academy @ Murray State University

The Commonwealth Honors Academy (CHA) is a challenging three-week academic, social and personal growth program for outstanding high school students who have completed their junior year and will return to high school as a senior in the fall following the Academy.  Students will be selected from the Commonwealth and surrounding region.  Upon successful completion of the Academy, students will:

·         receive six hours of university credit.

·         have the opportunity to take six hours of university courses at Murray State University during the subsequent academic year. 

·         be awarded a four-year, renewable $2,000 housing scholarship to attend Murray State University. 

The Academy differs from the traditional high school in its approach to learning and in the creation of a living-learning community.   CHA offers students a chance to know and make friends with other enthusiastic, energetic students with high intellectual capacities.  The interaction of students with different backgrounds is one of the most valuable aspects of the Academy.

The Academy provides students, faculty and staff with an opportunity to share the joy of discovery and to exchange ideas in a warm community atmosphere.  Supportive secondary and university faculty chosen from the region work closely with the students in classes, seminars, and extracurricular activities.  Outstanding college men and women serve as residential counselors to provide leadership, friendship, and encouragement to the students.  Exceptional speakers, performers, films, interesting field trips, special events and recreational experiences offer students an array of stimulating activities that provide fun and enjoyment, as well as learning opportunities.

There is no cost to students except for a $195 tuition processing fee.*  In addition, students are responsible for personal articles, laundry, snacks, and incidental expenses.

*Fee waived for students receiving free or reduced student lunch, or ACT Fee Waiver.  See your guidance counselor.

March 1, 2015

$500 Scholarship Opportunity for current sophomore students

 

Kentucky rising junior could win scholarship, photo shoot

 A rising junior at one of Kentucky’s public or private high schools will win a $500 scholarship and a photo shoot at his or her school through the “Promote Your School” scholarship contest, sponsored by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA).

To enter, the student must submit an essay about one of these subjects:

 · What my aspiration for my generation is.

 

· How I am preparing for my future.

 

· How my education plans will affect my community.

 

· What a middle school student should do in high school to prepare for college.

 The essay must be no more than 200 words long and cannot mention the student’s name, school, county or community. The essay topic must be shown at the top of the page. The student’s name, address and high school must be listed at the bottom of the essay. The student must be a junior during the 2015-16 school year. For more information, visit www.kheaa.com/website/contest/intro.

To enter, mail your essay to KHEAA Publications, P.O. Box 798, Frankfort, KY 40602. You also may e-mail your essay to publications@kheaa.com or fax it to (502) 696-7574. The winner will be chosen by a committee of KHEAA employees. The deadline for submissions is May 31. Photos from the winning school will be used in KHEAA publications and on KHEAA websites.

The deadline for submissions is May 31.

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Seniors:  Here’s some great information about frequently asked questions concerning federal student aid…visit

http://www.federalstudentaid.ed.gov/federalaidfirst/index.html

Senior Parents

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: *The Thin White Envelope: How to Help Your Teen Handle College Rejection

Rejection—no matter what your age—is tough. But for a senior who had his or her hopes pinned on a dream college, rejection can really sting.

Some universities are extremely selective. For example, Stanford University just announced that it sent offers to just 7.2% of its class of 2014 applicants! That means that 92.8% of those applicants received rejection letters.

If your student was not accepted by his or her dream school, here are some thoughts to share:

1.    Don’t take the decision personally. College admissions officials must bring together a diverse group of entering freshmen. Diversity includes, among other things, geographical area, extracurricular activities, and academic interests.

2.    The college may not have been a good match for you. In fact, maybe the admissions officer saw something that showed the college would not be a good fit for your personal skills, interests, and talents.

3.    Remember all your strengths. The right college will recognize and reward you with an acceptance.

4.    You aren't alone. Most students receive at least one rejection letter.

5.    Recognize that attending big name College X doesn't guarantee success. There are many paths to a great college experience and future career.

While it’s heart-breaking to see your teenager disappointed, college rejections happen. But they don’t have to define the rest of your student’s life. Discuss options with your teenager for the upcoming year. A few ideas might include:

1.    Accepting a second- or third-choice college.

2.    Attending a community college for a year or two and then reapplying to a 4-year college. Doing this is a great way to save money and complete transferable classes, and in the end, that final diploma comes from the 4-year college.

3.    Taking a “gap” year and working, volunteering, and/or completing an internship.

4.    Using the year to beef up credentials. Your student could retake the ACT, learn a language, or add new skills that set him or her apart to re-apply next year.

5.    Appealing to the college if new information is available (for example, maybe your student’s grades went up dramatically or he or she won a major competition since applying to the college). Note: A student shouldn’t appeal a college’s decision simply because he or she was disappointed. There must be compelling new information that was not available at the time of application.

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Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: *College Planning Tips … For Parents

Even if you attended college, preparing your teenager for college today is a whole new ball game. These strategies will help you support your student’s academic journey.

All ParentsDescription: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: http://www.act.org/path/parent/news/images/grey_bar.gif

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: *Academic Checklist: How Your Teen Can Get the Most out of High School

Whether you’re the parent of a junior high school student preparing for high school or are sending your senior off to college, the tips below will help make college planning much easier. To read more, please visit ACT’s college planning checklist.

Your Freshman Should:

Your Sophomore Should:

Your Junior Should:

Your Senior Should:

GoHigher Kentucky Planner Timeline

12th Grade/Senior Year

Fall Semester

August/September:  Review your high school transcript. Will you meet all graduation and college entrance requirements?

§  Narrow your list of schools; request catalogues and admissions information.

§  Register for October SAT and/or ACT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Sign up for ACT or SAT prep courses.

October:

§  Review admissions applications; begin writing essays (if required).

§  Meet with college admissions representatives or schedule visits to schools you are interested in attending. Talk with students and staff.

§  Register for December ACT and/or SAT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Attend college fairs and financial aid nights.

§  Request recommendations from teachers, employers, and guidance counselors.

§  If applying for Early Decision, send in application.

November:

§  If you haven't already, register for December ACT and/or SAT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Watch for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) that will be available from your high school counselor, the financial aid office of the school you plan to attend, or www.fafsa.ed.gov.

§  Continue working on application essays.

§  Begin preparing your college applications.

§  Watch scholarship deadlines.

December:

§  Register for January SAT and/or February ACT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Finalize application essays and complete the admissions procedures for your top school choices.

§  Remind your references of application deadlines. Send thank-you notes to these people.

§  Mail all applications or turn them in to your high school, depending on the system your school uses.

§  Keep copies of all admissions applications.

Spring Semester

 

January:

If accepted for Early Decision, withdraw other applications.

§  Gather the information necessary to complete the FAFSA.  EVERYONE is being encouraged to file the FAFSA Online via the internet.  This speeds up the process of verifying your qualification for federal and state financial aid.  Submit as soon as possible after January 1.

§  Keep copies of all financial aid applications.

February: Register for March SAT and/or April ACT. This may be your LAST CHANCE to earn your full KEES scholarship award. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Obtain a physical examination. Forward to each school requiring a physical exam as a condition of admission.

§  Review college acceptances and compare with financial aid offers.

§  Make sure that mid-year transcripts have been sent to the school to which you have applied if required.

§  Gather the information necessary to complete the FAFSA.  If you expect any financial assistance from either State or Federal Sources you must file a FAFSA (Free Application For Student Aid).  This can be done via the internet or by using a paper application.  See your counselor for a paper application or visit http://federalstudentaid.ed.gov  EVERYONE is being encouraged to file the FAFSA Online via the internet.  This speeds up the process of verifying your qualification for federal and state financial aid.  Submit as soon as possible after January 1.

§  Keep copies of all financial aid applications

March:

§  Register for May SAT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Make a final decision about a school. Send in a deposit and notify other schools of your decision.

§  Request course descriptions and schedules from the school you have chosen.

§  Watch for your Student Aid Report (SAR); review it for accuracy.

April:

§  Register for June SAT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Confirm housing arrangements. If necessary, send in deposits.

§  Research Advanced Placement (AP) or College Level Examinations Program (CLEP) exams.

§  If you do not qualify for need-based aid or need additional financial assistance, consider other sources such as loans, work-study, or cooperatives.

May:

§  Register for June ACT. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Complete AP examinations.

§  Submit scholarship acceptance forms.

§  Make sure you have returned all financial aid award notices.

§  Plan to attend freshman orientation and registration.

June:

§  Make sure your final transcript is sent to the school you will be attending.

§  College can be expensive. A summer job can help pay some of your expenses.

Summer After Senior Year

July:

§  Make a list of what you will need to take with you for your dorm room.

§  If you haven't met your roommate, call, write, or e-mail to get acquainted.

August:

§  Make sure housing documentation is quickly accessible when you move into the dorm.

§  Review a campus map. Learn how to get around at your new school.

§  Buy your books and supplies after the first class meeting.

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GoHigher Kentucky Planner Timeline

11th Grade/Junior Year

Fall Semester

August:

§  Start your year off right: Talk with your guidance counselor about your options and your plans. Be sure to ask about test dates for the PSAT, ACT, and SAT. You'll need to register up to six weeks ahead of time.

§  Sign up for courses with your eyes on the prize: college and money to pay for it! A tougher course load may pay off with scholarships and may get you a better chance to get admitted to the school of your choice.

§  Start investigating private and public sources for financial aid. Take note of scholarship deadlines and plan accordingly.

§  Sign up for activities to boost your college applications.


September:

§  Find out about schools you are interested in attending. Treat your school selection process like a research paper: Make a file and gather information about schools, financial aid, and campus life to put in it. Go to college fairs and open houses and learn as much as you can from the Internet about schools.

§  Begin planning college visits. Fall, winter, and spring break are good times because you can observe a campus when classes are going on.


October:

§  Sign up to take the PSAT IF you are interested in being in the running for the National Merit Scholarship OR if you need a test score for your application to the Governor’s Scholars Program this year  . You'll get the results by Christmas.

§  Sign up for ACT or SAT prep courses. You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

§  Do your top college picks require essays or recommendations? Now is the time to begin planning your essays and choosing whom you'd like to ask for a recommendation.

November:

§  Applications for the Governor's Scholars Program are available in your guidance counselor's office. The program offers high school juniors a taste of college life.

§  Sign up for the ACT and SAT, if you haven't already.

§  You must take the ACT/SAT before high school graduation to qualify for the KEES scholarship bonus award.

December:

§  Begin the application process for service academies (West Point, Annapolis, etc.)

§  Decide if you should take AP exams in May. Investigate the CLEP program.

Spring Semester

January:

§  Meet with your guidance counselor again to develop your senior schedule.

§  Organize your Individual Graduation Plan.


February:

§  Think about lining up a summer job, internship, or co-op.

§  Plan campus visits for spring break.

§  Memorize your Social Security number if you haven't already. It will be your identity on campus.


March/April:

§  Get ready for AP exams next month.

§  Write a resume.


May:

§  May 1 is the last day for students to accept or decline their Governor's Scholars appointments.

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☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻☻

GoHigher Kentucky Planner Timeline

10th Grade/Sophomore Year

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GoHigher Kentucky Planner Timeline

9th Grade/Freshman Year


Remember, you will have more options if you start planning now for college and do your best to earn good grades.

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Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: MCj03983550000[1]Getting Admitted To A College or University

You've decided to get a higher education and you know which school you want to attend. What next?

·         Get an application for admission from the school's admissions office or Web site, or apply online at GoHigher Kentucky. Complete and return the application. Pay attention to deadlines.

·         Make arrangements to have your high school transcript sent to the school. Get a housing application if you're going to live on campus and submit it as soon as possible. Find out about deposits, orientations, and registering for classes. After you've been accepted, notify the school of your decision and let the other schools you've applied to know you won't attend.

·         If you have questions or don't understand something, ask your parents, guidance counselor, or the admissions director at the college.

·         Find out what tests are required and the deadlines for submitting the results. Be sure to confirm this information with the school. If you've taken the required tests, check with the school to make sure it has your results. It's up to you to make sure you've taken the correct tests and that the results have been reported.

·         Some schools use an enrollment contract to explain what you can expect them to give you for your money. Read the contract carefully before you sign it. A representative of the school may promise you things that aren't in the contract, such as help finding a job. If the representative makes you a promise, ask him or her to write the promise on the contract and sign and date it. A promise is usually not enforceable in court unless it's in writing.

Early Decision and Early Action

·         In Early Decision, you make a commitment to enroll in a school if you are admitted. You have to withdraw all other applications and make a nonrefundable deposit by a date well before May 1. One possible disadvantage to Early Decision is that it may mean you don't have any leverage in negotiating a better financial aid package from the school you choose.

·         With Early Action, you apply to your preferred school and receive a decision before the normal response date. You don't have to enroll at the institution or make a deposit before May 1.

·         For more information, including deadline and notification dates, contact the admissions office of the school you are interested in attending.

College Information

AEC Southern Ohio College

Alice Lloyd College

Asbury College

Ashland Community and Technical College

Beckfield College

Bellarmine University

Berea College

Bluegrass Technical & Community College

Bowling Green Technical College

Brescia University

Campbellsville University

Central Kentucky Technical College

Centre College

Cumberland College

Daymar Colege

Draughons Junior College

Eastern Kentucky University

Elizabethtown Technical College

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Gateway Community and Technical College

Georgetown College

Hazard Community College

Henderson Community College

Hopkinsville Community College

Indiana Wesleyan University

ITT Technical Institute

Jefferson Community College

Jefferson Technical College

Kentucky Christian College

Kentucky Mountian Bible College

Kentucky State University

Kentucky Wesleyan College

Lindsey Wilson College

Louisville Technical Institute

Madisonville Community College

Mayo Technical College

Maysville Community College

McKendree College

Mid-Continent College

Midway College

Morehead State University

Murry State University

National College of Business and Technology

Northern Kentucky University

Northwood University

Owensboro Community and Technical College

Paducah Technical College

Pikeville College

Prestonsburg Community College

RETS Institute of Technology

Saint Catharine College

Somerset Community College

Southeast Community College

Southwestern College of Business

Spalding University

Spencerian College

Sullivan University

Thomas More College

Transylvania University

Union College

University of Kentucky

University of Louisville

West Kentucky Community and
Technical College

Western Kentucky University

 

 

·         Campus Tours
Providing fast and easy access to the interactive tours of colleges across the US!

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Prepare for College

Education past high school can be as much or as little as you want! Trade school, technical school, and two-year or four-year college degrees are all options past high school.

Going to school after graduation may be the last thing you want to hear about. But attending college after you earn your high school diploma increases your job opportunities, your earning power, and your ability to enjoy a better life.

Get a bachelors degree and you can make almost $21,180 a year more than your friends with just a high school diploma.

Do the math: $21,180 times a 30-year career equals over half a million dollars! ($635,400 to be exact). Even if you don't like math, you have to love that!

Information from the U.S. Census shows earnings increase with higher education:

You already know pursuing more education or training can mean more money in salary over your lifetime. So what else is holding you back from a plan for your future?

My grades aren't good enough for college.

Good grades are important. Better grades can mean a better chance to get into the school and program of your choice. Good grades can also mean money for college. As a Kentuckian, each year you make at least a 2.5 GPA, you are eligible for a Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES).

But colleges don't just look at grades and test scores when making admission decisions, either. Extracurricular activities, talent in arts or sports, and community service can also play a part in their decision. So, you aren't going to be the valedictorian next year? Plenty of successful college students weren't either!

I don't know what I want to be when I grow up ... But I know I don't want to ...

If you know what you don't like, chances are you know what you DO like. Talk with people whose careers or jobs interest you, asking where they went to school and what they thought of the program they took. Ask your parents, guidance counselor, or librarian for help in your career quest. Check out the Occupational Outlook Handbook or the Kentucky Occupational Outlook report. You can access the handbook online at www.bls.gov/oco/home.htm, or Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: This links to a PDF documentdownload the report.

Tech school, community college, private college, or university? Which would be best for me?

Again, talk with your parents, guidance counselor, or anyone in a career you think you'd like. Ask what school they attended. Develop a list of schools you are interested in and contact them for more information. What tests and qualifications are required for admission? Know your options!

I can't afford it.

Most college students and their families don't write a check for their college education. Financial aid is available and is based on your family's ability to pay for college. Besides, after looking at how much more an education can pay you over a lifetime, how can you NOT afford it? Talk with your high school guidance counselor. Read Affording Higher Education, a KHEAA book that lists 3,200 financial aid sources available to Kentucky students. It's available at www.kheaa.com.

Every plan has to have its first steps. Once you decide what general career direction you want to pursue, meet with your guidance counselor to discuss what classes to take to fit into your higher education goals.

What about...

You should be familiar with your Individual Graduation Plan, which you have reviewed each year with your guidance counselor. To pursue a Kentucky college education, you must meet the Precollege Curriculum requirements.

Bonus high school courses

Dual credit courses count for both high school and college credit. They can save you time and money in pursuing your education goals, so they are worth checking out. Visit the Kentucky Virtual High School's Discover College Online for more information.

CLEP program

The College-Level Examination Program offers more than 30 tests for subjects often taken during the first two college years. Many colleges use CLEP scores to award college credit. Some private industries, businesses, and other groups use CLEP scores to satisfy requirements for licensing, advancement, and admissions to training programs.

Commonwealth Diploma

A Commonwealth Diploma is awarded to seniors who complete 22 credit units, meet all minimum requirements of the Precollege Curriculum, and who get a grade of "C" or better in four Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) courses in English, science, and a foreign language, plus another AP/IB course. Students must also complete three AP or IB exams in those subject areas.

These courses could also count as dual credit for both high school graduation and college.

Check with both your high school guidance counselor and the colleges you are interested in attending for more information. AP or IB courses may also be available through the Kentucky Virtual High School, independent study, or a college or university.

Institutional challenge exam

You can also take a test to prove you are proficient in a subject matter at a higher education institution. If you can pass the test, you can get credit for the course without having taken (or even paid) for it. Ask the colleges you are considering if this option is available.

Tech classes

Interested in a technical field like welding, information technology, health science, or carpentry? You may want to take technical education classes offered at 53 Kentucky area technology centers. Most Kentucky Tech credits will transfer to the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS).

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PLAN (10TH Grade)

TEST DATE:  Fall ( Date Sept. 18)

The PLAN® program helps 10th graders build a solid foundation for future academic and career success and provides information needed to address school districts' high-priority issues. It is a comprehensive guidance resource that helps students measure their current academic development, explore career/training options, and make plans for the remaining years of high school and post-graduation years.

PLAN can help all students—those who are college-bound as well as those who are likely to enter the workforce directly after high school.

As a "pre-ACT" test, PLAN is a powerful predictor of success on the ACT. At the same time, many schools recognize the importance of PLAN testing for all students, as it focuses attention on both career preparation and improving academic achievement.

Typically, PLAN is administered in the fall of the sophomore year.

PSAT (11th Grade)

About PSAT/NMSQT

TEST DATE:  Fall ( Date Oct. 15th)

The Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test is a co-sponsored program by the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation.

PSAT/NMSQT stands for Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test.  It’s a standardized test that provides firsthand practice for the SAT Reasoning Test.  It also gives you a chance to enter National Merit Scholarship Corporation Scholarship programs.

The PSAT/NMSQT measures:

·         Critical reading skills

·         Math problem-solving skills

·         Writing skills

You have developed these skills over many years, both in and out of school.  This test doesn’t require you to recall specific facts from your classes.

The most common reasons for taking the PSAT/NMSQT are:

·         To receive feedback on your strengths and weaknesses on skills necessary for college study.  You can then focus your preparation on those areas that could most benefit from additional study or practice.

·         To see how your performance on an admissions test might compare with that of others applying to college.

·         To enter the competition for scholarships from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation (grade 11).

·         To help prepare for the SAT.  You can become familiar with the kinds of questions and the exact directions you will see on the SAT.

Scores & Review

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