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Welcome to the Counselor's Corner

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Seniors:  If you didn’t walk in graduation and would like to pick up your diploma, stop by the guidance office   between 8:00 – 3:00.

 


Junior/Seniors 2016-17:  If you plan on taking a dual credit course through either the University of the Cumberlands or Eastern Kentucky University you MUST apply online to be considered for admissions to either University.  Apply online at www.ucumberlands.edu/dualcredit/apply for the University of the Cumberlands and at http://dualcredit.eku.edu/how-do-i-apply-0 for Eastern Kentucky University.  Remember there is also a contract that must be signed and returned to the High School to be considered for this opportunity.  Documents required for these programs are available for download under “Student Links” on the WCHS homepage or at http://www.whitley.kyschools.us/pages/WCHS/Student_Links.html .  Call your guidance counselor if you have questions regarding this program. 

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June 1-3, 2016:  Make up Finals  8:00 – 2:00

June 3, 2016:  Last day for student final report cards to be mailed. 

June 6, 2016:  Summer School begins for students needing to recover lost credits.

 

Text Box: Here’s our guidance staff.  Please call, email or stop by if you have any question.

Our staff is here to assist all students and parents in having a successful high school experience.

Contact Mrs. Reynolds, HS Counselor at linda.reynolds@whitley.kyschools.us

Mrs. Reynolds’ office is located in the Freshman Academy Office Complex.  She is available to help all WCHS students but her primary responsibilities are freshman students and Electronic Computer School – Credit Recovery.

 
 


Mrs. Faulkner’s office is located in the Main Building Office Complex.  She is available to help all WCHS students, but is primarily responsible for tracking students with the last names beginning with A - K.

 
Contact Mrs. Faulkner, HS Counselor at britney.faulkner@whitley.kyschools.us

Contact Mr. Lowrie, HS Counselor at kevin.lowrie@whitley.kyschools.us

Mr. Lowrie’s office is located in the Main Building Office Complex.  He is available to help any WCHS student, but is primarily responsible for tracking students with the last names beginning with  L - Z.

 
 


Office Hours 7:15 - 3:30 

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Contact Angie Canada, Records Clerk at angela.canada@whitley.kyschools.us

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

What's the big deal about school anyway?

Can't I get a good job now?

Yes, maybe you can, but the statistics are against you.  Check out the earnings and unemployment rates from people 25 years and older in Kentucky with different levels of education:

Level of education completed

Unemployment rate in 2006

Median earnings in 2006

Less than a high school diploma

11.4%

$17,077

High school graduate, no college

6.3%

$25,288

Some college, no degree

5.4%

$28,625

Associate degree

3.4%

$30,047

Bachelor’s degree

2.1%

$40,925

Master’s Degree

1.8%

$48,642

Professional degree

1.5%

$66,032

Doctoral degree

1.3%

$83,649

Source:  2008 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Median Kentucky earnings by educational level for workers 25 or older employed full time; unemployment for workers 25 or older.

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Graph of median Kentucky earnings by educational level for workers 25 or older employed full time; unemployment for workers 25 or older.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Sometimes it’s hard to stay in school if you think you need to be working to earn money.  But, if you finish high school and go on to college, you’ll have a wider variety of jobs to choose from and you’ll earn more.

MC900156849[1]Workforce Kentucky

The Office of Employment and Training has developed a comprehensive labor market workforce information system called Workforce Kentucky.  The system is designed to serve employers, job seekers, students, counselors, educators and training providers.  This interactive Internet-based system can be accessed at www.workforcekentucky.ky.gov.  It is the largest source of labor market data in the commonwealth.  Users can explore occupations, labor markets, geographic areas, industry projections, and much more.  The following are brief explanations of the various types of information and reports available to the user.

Essential Skills to Getting a Job

This is good information for ALL students: Often referred to as "soft skills", work ethic, communication, teamwork and critical thinking are all must have's for youth in today's job market. http://www.dol.gov/odep/documents/essential_job_skills.pdf

MC900432637[1]Career Snapshots (videos)

Want to learn more about a particular career path (job)?  Visit this website http://www.careeronestop.org/Videos/CareerandClusterVideos/career-and-cluster-videos.aspx to watch short videos detailing the basics of a variety of jobs in America today.

Current Senior Scholarship & Program Opportunities

Title

Criteria

Deadline

 

 

 

Mountain News WYMT:  “Mountain Achiever Award”

WYMT-TV and the University of Pikeville want to honor outstanding seniors with the weekly Mountain Student Achiever Award.

Seniors must have a 3.7 GPA or higher.  Winners are selected based on their GPA, extracurricular activities and community service. 

If you would like to be considered for this recognition, please pick up an application in the Guidance Office or Café, fill it out completely, and return it to your Guidance Counselor.

All Year

SESPTC Southeastern States Pupil Transportation Conference  - Buster Bynum Education Scholarship

Family Income less than $75,000

Parent/guardian has been an active employee in the public school transportation during the past three years.

GPA 3.0

$2500

May 1, 2016

KY Association of Pupil Transportation Scholarship

$1000

Parent/guardian actively employed in the public school pupil transportation field.

Gross family income of no more than $55,000

May 1, 2016

Med Camp

Spencerian College Summer Camp

Spencerian College | June 12-17, 2016 - Reserve Your Space Today!

Registration and Cost:

$395 Total (With Housing); $295 Total (Without Housing)

Reminders:

*YOU MUST APPLY AND PAY IN FULL BY MAY 15, 2016
Overnight Med Campers must check in to Campbell House on Sunday, June 12, 2016.

Full details at spencerian.edu/medcamp 

May 15, 2016

Current Underclassmen Opportunities

Title

Criteria/Info.

Deadline

Kentucky Boys State

Summer Enrichment Camp

Junior Students

June 5-10 at Campbellsville University

Boys State

Kentucky Boys State

What is Boys State?
American Legion Boys State is among the most respected educational programs of government instruction for high school students, and is considered a highly regarded leadership training program. Each participant becomes a part of the operation of his local, county and state government. Boys State has been a program of The American Legion since 1935, and was established in Kentucky in 1940.

At American Legion Boys State, participants are exposed to the rights and privileges, the duties and the responsibilities of a franchised citizen. The training is objective and practical with city, county and state governments operated by the students elected to the various offices. Activities include legislative sessions, court proceedings, law enforcement presentations, training in various topics, assemblies, journalism and recreational programs.

High school juniors are selected by local American Legion Posts to attend the program. Selection can be made as well by the Executive Director, especially for students in areas under represented by American Legion Posts. In most cases, expenses associated with attending this program are paid by a sponsoring American Legion Post, a local business or another community-based organization. Parents are allowed to donate the fees for their child to attend the program.

Visit:  www.kyboysstate.org

TBA

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Seniors:  Here’s some great information about frequently asked questions concerning federal student aid…visit

http://www.federalstudentaid.ed.gov/federalaidfirst/index.html

Senior Parents

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: *The Thin White Envelope: How to Help Your Teen Handle College Rejection

Rejection—no matter what your age—is tough. But for a senior who had his or her hopes pinned on a dream college, rejection can really sting.

Some universities are extremely selective. For example, Stanford University just announced that it sent offers to just 7.2% of its class of 2014 applicants! That means that 92.8% of those applicants received rejection letters.

If your student was not accepted by his or her dream school, here are some thoughts to share:

1.    Don’t take the decision personally. College admissions officials must bring together a diverse group of entering freshmen. Diversity includes, among other things, geographical area, extracurricular activities, and academic interests.

2.    The college may not have been a good match for you. In fact, maybe the admissions officer saw something that showed the college would not be a good fit for your personal skills, interests, and talents.

3.    Remember all your strengths. The right college will recognize and reward you with an acceptance.

4.    You aren't alone. Most students receive at least one rejection letter.

5.    Recognize that attending big name College X doesn't guarantee success. There are many paths to a great college experience and future career.

While it’s heart-breaking to see your teenager disappointed, college rejections happen. But they don’t have to define the rest of your student’s life. Discuss options with your teenager for the upcoming year. A few ideas might include:

1.    Accepting a second- or third-choice college.

2.    Attending a community college for a year or two and then reapplying to a 4-year college. Doing this is a great way to save money and complete transferable classes, and in the end, that final diploma comes from the 4-year college.

3.    Taking a “gap” year and working, volunteering, and/or completing an internship.

4.    Using the year to beef up credentials. Your student could retake the ACT, learn a language, or add new skills that set him or her apart to re-apply next year.

5.    Appealing to the college if new information is available (for example, maybe your student’s grades went up dramatically or he or she won a major competition since applying to the college). Note: A student shouldn’t appeal a college’s decision simply because he or she was disappointed. There must be compelling new information that was not available at the time of application.

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Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: *College Planning Tips … For Parents

Even if you attended college, preparing your teenager for college today is a whole new ball game. These strategies will help you support your student’s academic journey.

All ParentsDescription: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: http://www.act.org/path/parent/news/images/grey_bar.gif

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: *Academic Checklist: How Your Teen Can Get the Most out of High School

Whether you’re the parent of a junior high school student preparing for high school or are sending your senior off to college, the tips below will help make college planning much easier. To read more, please visit ACT’s college planning checklist.

Your Freshman Should: